Hi, I could really use some help with drawing in perspective, more specifically, cityscapes, skycrapers, streets, activity, etc. I've seen some examples online, but they all seem complicated. Maybe because I mainly do portraits....or my brain is getting old, you know, old dog, new tricks. But I had what I thought was a really cool idea for a new painting, it involved Times Square.. But, for the life of me, I can't seem to pull off the proper perspective. If anyone out there can simplify, or, provide a link that does just that....I would be eternally grateful. Thanks in advance :)

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I try to simplify perspective into four areas:

Eyeline: Draw a line across your work (mentally, tracing paper, very thin paint or light pencil) that would be the horizon from where you are standing.  Things you see above that slant down to it, things from below slant up, at eye level they are on it.

Size:The vertical line closest to you is the longest, the nearest objects the biggest.

Overlapping: objects look closer when they are drawn over others further away.

Detail:  the things nearest you are more detailed e.g. a door in the distance would be a shape in the wall, close to you you would see the jambs, the panelling, the door knob, maybe the number or knocker.

Turn you picture upside down and study it.

Hope this helps.

 

Thank you Cecile, I will try again with your tips. You've been very helpful and I truly appreciate it:)
 
Cecile Steenbergen said:

I try to simplify perspective into four areas:

Eyeline: Draw a line across your work (mentally, tracing paper, very thin paint or light pencil) that would be the horizon from where you are standing.  Things you see above that slant down to it, things from below slant up, at eye level they are on it.

Size:The vertical line closest to you is the longest, the nearest objects the biggest.

Overlapping: objects look closer when they are drawn over others further away.

Detail:  the things nearest you are more detailed e.g. a door in the distance would be a shape in the wall, close to you you would see the jambs, the panelling, the door knob, maybe the number or knocker.

Turn you picture upside down and study it.

Hope this helps.

 

you can also use color and contrast as what is known as atmospheric perspective

Stronger and warmer colors in the foreground will bring the objects closer. Also higher contrasts in objects or between objects will also bring them forward. Contrast works well in combination of overlapping objects that are closer to the eye.

Thanks Michael, never really thought about it in that way. appreciated :0)

Michael Beckett said:

you can also use color and contrast as what is known as atmospheric perspective

Stronger and warmer colors in the foreground will bring the objects closer. Also higher contrasts in objects or between objects will also bring them forward. Contrast works well in combination of overlapping objects that are closer to the eye.

unfortunately you still have to get the perspective lines right for the other tricks to work lol!

you'll do great! :o)

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