I've recently gotten back into painting and this time using acrylics. Never thought I would end up doing abstract work but found this style quite liberating! I've always thought of myself as an impressionistic artist but now, I am not too sure anymore. Would love to hear some creative feedback from fellow artists who shares the passion!

Thanks,

Minvi

 

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Hi Minvi,

 

It's great to hear you are so enthusiastic about acrylics and exploring abstraction! :)

 

Since this is the Show & Tell forum, I've edited your post to include the painting you uploaded to your gallery. 

 

I love the sense of motion and texture in this painting.  It reminds me of a choppy sea at sunset.  It also reminds me a bit of Turner.  How large is this painting?  Do you plan to create more like this?

 

I love the blend of colors as well!

I also find abstract art to be very liberating. When I was growing up, I didn't get it...it just looked like something a 3 year old slapped on a piece of paper with no rhyme or reason. Later on as a teenager, though, i started exposing myself to more and more art in various genres and discovered there was so much more to it than that. And then about a year or so ago, I started exploring abstract art with my own hands and heart and mind. The work "Greek Fire" in my gallery was the one that really lead me down the path to understanding the appeal of abstract art. Suddenly everything was different...I didn't feel like I was forcing something, it came on it's own and it was a wonderful feeling. :)

 

I look forward to seeing more from you!

I really like the way you put in into words, "...the ability to focus on colour or movement or emotion over form." I think that's always been my issue when I am drawing or painting. I tend to get too anal about the slightest imperfection of the figure I am creating that it distracts from from simply enjoying the process.

 

Thank you for your thoughts!

Meg Mackenzie said:

Minvi, I really liked the waves painting that you posted on your gallery. It has real movement and vibrancy.

You are so right about abstract work being quite liberating. There are so many wonderful things one can do to extend one's boundaries. One of the things I like about working in the abstract is the ability to focus on colour or movement or emotion over form. I also like to add texture when working in abstract.

Have you ever painted with acrylics mixed with PVA glue? One has to work fairly quickly in order to stop the glue dyring on the brush or palette, but it cna create the most wonderful textures and spiky effects - a little like the textures achievable with oils but more textured than when one uses a simply acrylic medium with the paints. It's such fun to experiment with.

Thanks Thaneeya, you are too kind! This is a rather small painting but wished I did it on a a bigger canvas. I was trying to experiment with abstraction as I never thought I would really get into it. I thought I am more of an impressionistic artist but now I am not sure anymore. My problem when I am painting is that I get too involved, too anal, that I find the whole thing tedious and in the end not as gratifying. My work ends up looking like a big mess and then I get disappointed by the whole thing that I would forgo finishing what I started. I realize now by looking at other artworks that I don't necessarily need to conform to certain standards, that for now, I should take my time and enjoy the whole process of creating something unique. It also helps to be surrounded by fellow artists who are willing to critique my work.

Thaneeya McArdle said:

Hi Minvi,

 

It's great to hear you are so enthusiastic about acrylics and exploring abstraction! :)

 

Since this is the Show & Tell forum, I've edited your post to include the painting you uploaded to your gallery. 

 

I love the sense of motion and texture in this painting.  It reminds me of a choppy sea at sunset.  It also reminds me a bit of Turner.  How large is this painting?  Do you plan to create more like this?

 

I love the blend of colors as well!

Thank you Alicia. That's how I feel exactly about abstracts when I would see them in galleries. I'd be the  one with the harshest criticism because I always perceived them to be more of child's "doodle" rather than serious art. Of course over the years, that perception changed as I start to learn more of the techniques involved and how difficult it is sometimes to replicate them on canvas. Also, now I find that with abstracts, you tend to get many interpretations and that in itself is exciting -- to hear how others see the picture from their perspective!

Alicia N. Swindell said:

I also find abstract art to be very liberating. When I was growing up, I didn't get it...it just looked like something a 3 year old slapped on a piece of paper with no rhyme or reason. Later on as a teenager, though, i started exposing myself to more and more art in various genres and discovered there was so much more to it than that. And then about a year or so ago, I started exploring abstract art with my own hands and heart and mind. The work "Greek Fire" in my gallery was the one that really lead me down the path to understanding the appeal of abstract art. Suddenly everything was different...I didn't feel like I was forcing something, it came on it's own and it was a wonderful feeling. :)

 

I look forward to seeing more from you!

Three cheers for abstract art!  :)  

Indeed Meg is right in that abstraction frees us up from seeking mere perfection in depiction of form.  I feel that representational art owes a great deal to abstract concepts.  What would our appreciation of the ocean be, if we didn't value the elusive qualities of color, motion, serenity, transparency and reflectiveness?  Would we revere the horse, if we didn't see its sweeping lines, majesty and power?  Our ability to embrace intangibles is a unique human quality, so abstract art lets us celebrate being human.  And even more than simply enjoying the creative process in abstraction, I think we can truly appreciate line, color, emotion, etc. for its own sake!   They are worthy of our depiction.

Michael, You might as well be a writer (or perhaps you are) -- you have such a way with words! And I concur definitely with everything you stated. Very well put; couldn't have said it better. Thanks!

Michael Ricketson said:

Three cheers for abstract art!  :)  

Indeed Meg is right in that abstraction frees us up from seeking mere perfection in depiction of form.  I feel that representational art owes a great deal to abstract concepts.  What would our appreciation of the ocean be, if we didn't value the elusive qualities of color, motion, serenity, transparency and reflectiveness?  Would we revere the horse, if we didn't see its sweeping lines, majesty and power?  Our ability to embrace intangibles is a unique human quality, so abstract art lets us celebrate being human.  And even more than simply enjoying the creative process in abstraction, I think we can truly appreciate line, color, emotion, etc. for its own sake!   They are worthy of our depiction.

i really loved ur work.............
Thank you Chahat!

chahat sharma said:
i really loved ur work.............

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