I would like to discuss color selection.  Before painting this one I had to decide if I wanted the human figure to be done in warm or cool colors... my first inclination was to paint him in blues and greens, i.e. cool.  It was only after further thought and reflection that I finally decided to go warm, e.g. hat and flesh tones.  Do other folks follow this line of questions or some other on deciding on flesh tones and color selection, in general?

Views: 130

Replies to This Discussion

Warm colours seem to advance and cool seem to recede, so with the figure being the main focal point, I would think you should use warm colours there. That's what you want your viewer to look at.

Thank you Glen for taking the time to give feedback! 

I think I will wait for more responses before saying anything.  Hold on Glen, I´ll get back to you later today or tomorrow.

Looks like no one else has any comments so I will just say that your information is on target and helpful but wasn´t so helpful with me and my intent. I know about warm and cold directions but then I get to the shirt of the man and I see it´s blue and that says I am pushing him back as a body while pulling the red tones of his skin forward.  That was the conflict and issue I was trying to pose with my question.  But maybe you have more to add?   If so, please do.  I love some work and reviewed them before responding to your informative comment.

Well yes I was going to say that the shirt should probably be a warmer colour in this particular painting. Blue of course is cool, and also in this painting blends into the blue background. Maybe the size of the figure helps, can't really miss him, but I do work on the idea that you need to guide the eye of the viewer around your painting, and bringing the focal point forward makes sure they get the point of the painting. Rules can be broken but I think it does apply here.

Yes, much more specific and much more helpful!  Yes, there is a push-pull sense given to the viewer, and that was not my intent.  Anyway, thanks for adding more thought.   If I could do it over again... or if I do a second thinker painting in the future, I think I will harmonize the body colors more and make the shirt some tone of yellow... maybe mustard or ocher? 

I guess yellow would be a better colour for the shirt as long as it stands out over the pavers/tiles.

It's amazing how much planning needs to go into a painting at the start huh?

Some of my best planning comes at the end instead of at the start :)  When I was originally working on  it, the thought was to make him part of the sea as humans are mostly water anyway, so I chose a blue shirt for both practical as well as philosophical/conceptual reasons. Only after finishing and having doubts arise as to color selection and then getting your feedback suggest that indeed I had somehow missed on the color selection. Oh well, live and learn and you should know that the quality of your work tells me that you know what you are saying and that I should heed your advice. Best of luck.  I am going to be needing in the next couple of weeks.  Will see.

Color is relative.
• I first decide if I want a high, medium or low key painting.
• I think of where my painting is going to be placed and what colors will be near the finished painting.
• I always like to incorporate a bit of the surrounding colors in my palette choices.
• To prepare my canvas, I gesso and lightly sand my canvas twice, unless I’m painting on linen canvas.
• If I’m painting on a light acrylic background for a high key painting, I roll on a coat of acrylic on my canvas, sand when it dries, roll another coat of acrylic and very lightly sand a second time. I like the canvas to have an egg shell type feeling.
• If, I’m painting my piece in oils, I tone my entire canvas with a coat of thinned raw umber.
• Then I underpaint my design in gray or raw umber values. Following this.... I’m ready to paint the finished piece. I almost always glaze my paintings to strengthen the darks, shadows and build the highlights! Best to everyone, Joan

Thanks for sharing.

Joan Simpson said:

Color is relative.
• I first decide if I want a high, medium or low key painting.
• I think of where my painting is going to be placed and what colors will be near the finished painting.
• I always like to incorporate a bit of the surrounding colors in my palette choices.
• To prepare my canvas, I gesso and lightly sand my canvas twice, unless I’m painting on linen canvas.
• If I’m painting on a light acrylic background for a high key painting, I roll on a coat of acrylic on my canvas, sand when it dries, roll another coat of acrylic and very lightly sand a second time. I like the canvas to have an egg shell type feeling.
• If, I’m painting my piece in oils, I tone my entire canvas with a coat of thinned raw umber.
• Then I underpaint my design in gray or raw umber values. Following this.... I’m ready to paint the finished piece. I almost always glaze my paintings to strengthen the darks, shadows and build the highlights! Best to everyone, Joan

RSS

Guidelines

New to the site? Check out our Guide to Getting Started.

Please take a moment to read our Member Guidelines. Thanks!

Need help?

If you need assistance with this site, please visit the Site Help forum where the moderators and/or other members will assist you.

About

The Art Colony is a fun online art community for artists of all abilities working in painting, drawing, mixed media, sculpture and handicrafts! Join us and share your art, ask questions, receive tips, and make new friends!

 

It is 100% FREE to join the Art Colony and always will be!

Cheekyjane

Artist and Owner of The Art Colony                      

The Art Colony is co-run by a fabulous team of enthusiastic moderators:

 

Pat

Stacy

Nick

Members

© 2019   Created by Jane Miles. All Rights Reserved.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Privacy Policy  |  Terms of Service